What the Health Magazine

Delivering the latest buzz on fitness, nutrition and wellness for Syracuse University students.

How to Keep Those Whites Pearly

Everybody wants to have clean teeth. If you brush your teeth twice a day you’re doing all you can, right? Wrong. What we eat plays a lot in to our dental health and hygiene. Here’s what to look for and what to avoid:

The Best

1. Fiber-filled fruits and veggies. Look for foods like celery, peppers, spinach, apples, berries, and bananas. These foods stimulate salivation in your mouth (yes, a little gross), which naturally cleans your teeth, preventing cavities and decay. After you eat, saliva helps neutralize the acids and enzymes that are attacking your teeth.

2. All things dairy. That means milk, yogurt, cheese, etc. The calcium and phosphorus in these foods restore lost minerals to your teeth.

3. Green and black teas. These teas contain polyphenols, which help destroy the plaque that builds up on teeth and creates acids that attack our teeth.

4. Sugarless gum. It may be less tasty, but it also helps activate those saliva glands to clean our teeth.

5. Fluoridated foods. AKA anything that has fluoride, like tap water, some bottled water (it will say on the bottle), and dehydrated soups. Remember fluoride rinses in elementary school? It’s the same thing, only natural.

 

The Worst

1. Soda. Soda contains sugar, allowing for cavities to build, as well as citric and phosphoric acids, which break down tooth enamel.

2. Raisins. Yes, they contain iron, but they are also high in sugar. Even worse, they are very sticky, so that sugar sits in your teeth and causes cavities.

3. Starchy foods. Foods like white and other soft breads and potato chips stick to teeth, where they break down into sugar and then acid, both of which are harmful for teeth.

4. Gummy and sugary sweets. That means all gummy candies, things with caramel, and hard candy, too. Although they are great in taste, they also have high amounts of sugar,and build cavities. Luckily, chocolate’s sugar is coated in fat, thus slipping out of teeth. Yay!

5. Acidic foods. Foods like lemons, tomatoes, and orange juice all are high in acidity, which break down the enamel on teeth.

By Aisling Williams

About these ads

Information

This entry was posted on November 15, 2011 by in Blog, Get Well and tagged , , , .

Archives

%d bloggers like this: